The Yemeni Revolution: unachieved dreams

Most of the resolutions that resulted from the National Dialogue Conference in Yemen are yet to be implemented: the Transitional Justice Law has not been enacted yet and the National Commission for Transitional Justice has not been established either. Even an independent committee to investigate into the human rights violations perpetrated in 2011 has not been created.
2015-03-29

Adel Moujahed al Sharjabi

Sociology Professor at Sanaa University


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Most of the resolutions that resulted from the National Dialogue Conference in Yemen are yet to be implemented: the Transitional Justice Law has not been enacted yet and the National Commission for Transitional Justice has not been established either. Even an independent committee to investigate into the human rights violations perpetrated in 2011 has not been created. Additionally, the parliament failed to pass a law for the reclamation of money stolen by the former corrupt authorities and monopoly contracts in oil and pertinent services have not been annulled. To make matters worse, the state did nothing to take back the weapons and military equipment seized by different militias during the armed conflicts and the army was not integrated in a way that would transform it into a unified, professional national military. Moreover, most political prisoners and the forcibly disappeared have not been released; the ministry of media has not been cancelled nor was an independent committee established to supervise media and information. The national and political security apparatuses have not been restructured and their duties are not specified. Finally, state buildings have not been evacuated of the militias that had taken control of them. The Yemeni revolution of 11 February 2011 is the first revolution led and carried out by popular masses and a middle class that managed to impose their vision during the transitional national conference, but things have changed dramatically since then.

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