The services rendered by the Moroccan Opposition to the Government

Unlike their companions eastwards, the Muslim Brotherhood in Morocco are doing just fine. Three years have come and gone since the formation of the government led by the Islamist Justice and Development Party. The government assumed its tasks facing a fragile opposition amidst an overwhelming populist atmosphere. The unprecedented antics of Abdelilah Benkirane, the
2015-03-20

Mohamed Benaziz

Moroccan journalist and filmmaker


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Unlike their companions eastwards, the Muslim Brotherhood in Morocco are doing just fine. Three years have come and gone since the formation of the government led by the Islamist Justice and Development Party. The government assumed its tasks facing a fragile opposition amidst an overwhelming populist atmosphere. The unprecedented antics of Abdelilah Benkirane, the Moroccan Prime Minister, provoked his opponents. This was a PR-oriented strategy aimed, firstly, at luring his foes out of their comfort zone. He also sought to steal the limelight by addressing people in their crude everyday language, creating an immediate interaction with them. Accustomed to addressing people with a pretentious lexicon, meanwhile, Moroccan political parties are not used to this approach. Thus they fail to reach out to the people who consider their language obsolete. 
Whereas in Egypt the Muslim Brotherhood were sidelined from the political scene, resulting in a face-off between the army and the people in the streets, in Morocco, King Hassan VI, the Prime Minister and the leader of the banned Justice and Charity Association march together in the front with little trouble and all of them represent the Islamic identity. In addition to the surplus of Islamic identity in Morocco, it has also rained and oil prices have fallen. The country couldn’t have it any better!

 

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